Write your first B2B customer case study

 

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I have been working on some B1B business building projects, and am thrilled to now announce the first one:  write your first B2B customer case study, an online course dedicated to disseminating B2B knowledge.   B2B customer case study writing is perceived to be complicated and at times time-consuming. There are more than one element to work on – customer relation, creativity, interviewing, presentation and all these elements look to be of a diverse nature.

Learning about each of these elements and mastering them is time-consuming.

Creating case studies isn’t like writing a college business report. It isn’t like writing a blog post, white paper or research report, either. A case study needs to breathe life, have a story behind it and show—­­not tell—­­potential customers why your product or service solves a real problem. In short, building a case study that converts is as much an art as it is a science.

This course will teach you both – arts and science with this skill.

This course will take you through the exact steps you need to take to get your first customer case study quickly.

Click here to go to the course.  

Trust is the key to B2B sale 

Due to the accountability that constrains most B2B buyers, trust and security are key issues.  No B2B buyer wants to risk his or her livelihood or reputation buying an unreliable product and service.  This makes emotional issues such as trust and security absolutely critical.  This, in turn, places great emphasis on brand, reputation, case studies which convey reliability and consistency over the life of the product being purchased.

Tools and techniques for building trust 

You believe your product offering improves the user experience, engagement, and revenue for your customers.  But how can the prospect believe that statement? You need to show it’s true using a real-life example of an existing customer.   The case study will tell the facts of what we did for the customer and the actual results he saw.  As a marketer, one of our biggest goals is to build trust. There are many ways you can work to build trust, but marketing case studies are the best way to prove that your efforts drive results.

What you will learn 

The obvious outcome of this course is – your first B2B case study, in a more efficient manner, that doesn’t distract you from your core focus on business.

This happens with the least amount of investment in terms of your time and resources.

If you are an entrepreneur or a freelance service provider for B2B clients, this course would lead you to have a collection of case studies showcasing where you excel and what expertise differentiates you from competitors. All this would mean more lead conversions, more sales closing, shorter sales cycles and more business for you.

If you are a b2b marketer, this course would give you an edge to understand how to build a B2B customer case study and how to make use of it in the best interest of your sales goals.

Click here to go to the course.

 

I will also keep you informed as my other  B2B projects develop, and will keep looking for ways to support all of you in your B2B business building.

 

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The 3 Things This Week : 22nd February, 2018

Hey,

Happy Thursday!

How are you doing this week?

Here are this week’s 3 things!

This week’s theme is blockchain technology. There are lots of development happening in this area in past few days. These 3 things on the subject would not possibly give some clarity on the situation with regard to trading. But the focus is on what to expect from this new technology when it comes to startups and new opportunities.

Thing # 1:  The Blockchain and Us

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The Wright brothers invented the airplane in 1903. When they flew it for the first time nobody could have predicted that one day there would be over 500,000 people traveling by air at any given moment in time. In 2008, Satoshi Nakamoto invented bitcoin and the blockchain. His invention made it possible to send money around the globe without the intervention of banks, governments, or any other intermediaries.

Much like the Wright brothers, Satochi solved a problem that had been previously deemed unsolvable. Whenever this happens what usually follows is a lot of inspiration and innovation as minds are opened to see the future from a totally different perspective.

How long will it take before this becomes the norm and before many of the tasks that were previously handled by individuals and institutions become fully automated? Some experts suggest that it could all happen within a decade or two. Watch this now.

Thing # 2:  Beyond the Bitcoin Bubble

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Steven Johnson has penned a long and wonderful piece in New York Times Magazine, in the recent days, exploring what lies beyond the speculative market in crypto tokens.

One interesting perspective explained here is about the blockchain as the architectural breakthrough that we need to move beyond the current Internet market dominated by a few large tech companies.  After all, it was not just the antitrust division of the Department of  Justice that challenged Microsoft’s monopoly power in the 1990s; it was also the emergence of new software and hardware — the web, open-source software, and Apple products — that helped undermine Microsoft’s dominant position.  The blockchain evangelists behind platforms like Ethereum believe that a comparable array of advances in software, cryptography, and distributed systems has the ability to tackle today’s digital problems: the corrosive incentives of online advertising; the quasi-monopolies of Facebook, Google, and Amazon.  Read this long article to get the sense of this perspective and how it will change the game for the new businesses and startups who use digital marketing channels.

Thing # 3Is Crypto the Future of Early Stage Funding?

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A lot of people in the crypto sector have suggested that ICOs and tokens are the future of early-stage investing and highly disruptive to venture capital.

Watch this video from the Upfront Conference 2018, where VCs and other investors discuss why that may not be the case. And also, find out how things would really pan out in this direction.

 

I  would love to hear your feedback on 3 Things This Week.

Hope you enjoy, and thanks again for the privilege of emailing you!

Wishing you lots of happy reading,

 

Shashank

 

 

P.S. –

 

1. The 3 Things This Week” is a free, short, curated list of useful articles, tools and other resources for building startup businesses. These 3 things would deal, in a random way, with different aspects of startup building – validation, traction, growth, funding, team, founders.

2. If you think of anyone who might enjoy this email, you can share this with a friend or co-worker.

 

Web – Climb Lean School of Starting Up

Facebook – Climb Lean Facebook page

Find a pain worth your time

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I get so many questions on Quora and I’m truly flattered that so many of aspiring entrepreneurs ask my opinion and ask for my help.

I’ve always been very happy to offer my thoughts on all aspects of starting up and how to go about how pain point is the starting point of a new business and how to get started from there. However, my schedule has become increasingly busy this the past few weeks and as such, I just don’t get as much time as I would like to answer every question in Quora in as much detail as I would like.

So I’ve put together a short course for aspiring entrepreneurs.

This is going to be an online training resource for wannabe founders, aspiring entrepreneurs,  people looking to do some side hustle projects, and student entrepreneurs or even first-time startup founders who have just started. I really hope it will become an invaluable one-stop site for learning and improving every aspect of your pain point, the starting point for a new business.

Probably the most common question I’ve been asked is  ‘How do I know if the pain point is worth my time to work on?’

So in response to all the questions and indeed so that I don’t let any of you down by not replying fully to a question I’ve created an online course called “Find a pain point that is worth your time” which is going to teach you, well how to get going when you want to startup!

So, click on this link  and you get started right away.

In this course, you will learn how to spot a pain point worth engaging with and in the process you’ll also discover if your new business idea is indeed worth working on before you start building your product.

Doing a sound foundation leads to building products that would work.

 

 

The 3 Things This Week : 15th February, 2018

Hey,

Happy Thursday!

I am happy to introduce you Climb Lean’s weekly newsletter – “The 3 Things This Week” to you.

Here are this week’s 3 things!

This week’s theme is lean startup methods and practices.

Thing # 1:  Intuition vs. Rationality: Where One Stops the Other Starts

 

1As human beings, we have two amazing gifts – the ability to think rationally and the ability to think intuitively.  The conclusion that rational and intuitive thinking is often in a state of conflict and are often misapplied.  We use my rational mind to solve problems that in reality, only intuitive thinking can solve, and vice-versa, when rational thinking is better suited for the problem at hand, we often deny what the rational brain is telling me and grope instead for an intuitive solution.

The rational thinking is most appropriate when a life situation has presented all the facts and there is a clear understanding of the consequences of a word or deed – there is no ambiguity or unknown.  The rational mind can clearly say “if A, then B.”  Because the world has a certain order and predictability, the rational mind can make reasoned decisions founded on the trust of this external order and predictability.   However, when faced with the unknowable, the rational mind refuses to let go–it struggles to “rationalize” an action by seeking more and more information that might help in making a decision based on the facts that it gathers.

Intuitive thinking is most appropriate when the consequences of our words and actions are unknown, where the intuitive mind makes an inner journey into the soul, becomes vulnerable and open to insights whose conclusions rest on the foundation of an inner sense of trust.

This is a thought-provoking article that has lessons in entrepreneurship when you are building a new business. You need to use both your intuitive mind and the rational mind in this, but you should know which one to use in what situations of your startup building.

Thing # 2:  Choice, happiness and spaghetti sauce

2In this TEDx talk, “Tipping Point” author Malcolm Gladwell gets inside the food industry’s pursuit of the perfect spaghetti sauce — and makes a larger argument about the nature of choice and happiness.

His talk has a few lessons for a startup building process when it comes to customer discovery on what people want.  Assumption number one, typically we have, is that the way to find out what people want, what will make people happy, is to ask them. The lesson is that people don’t know what they want! “The mind knows not what the tongue wants.” It’s a mystery!  And a critically important step in understanding our own desires is to realize that we cannot always explain what we want, deep down.

 

 

Thing # 3:  How great leaders inspire action? 

OIR_resizer-3Simon Sinek has a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership. In his TEDx talk, Simon explores how leaders can inspire cooperation, trust, and change. His model for inspirational leadership, involves 3 questions in 3 circles – Why? How? What? This little idea explains why some organizations and some leaders are able to inspire where others aren’t. He defines the terms really quickly. Every single person, every single organization on the planet knows what they do, 100 percent. Some know how they do it, whether you call it your differentiated value proposition or your proprietary process or your USP. But very, very few people or organizations know why they do what they do. And by “why” he doesn’t mean “to make a profit.” That’s a result. It’s always a result. By “why” he means: What’s your purpose? What’s your cause? What’s your belief? Why does your organization exist? Why do you get out of bed in the morning? And why should anyone care? We go from the clearest thing to the fuzziest thing. But the inspired leaders and the inspired organizations — regardless of their size, regardless of their industry –, all think, act and communicate from the inside out.  If you are not clear about and convinced about your and your startup’s “why”,  and if you are still fuzzy about your “why”, its time to spend some energies to get your act right.

 

 

I would love to hear your feedback on 3 Things This Week.

Hope you enjoy, and thanks again for the privilege of emailing you!

Wishing you lots of happy reading,

Shashank

 

P.S. –

1. The 3 Things This Week” is a free, short, curated list of useful articles, tools and other resources for building startup businesses. These 3 things would deal, in a random way, with different aspects of startup building – validation, traction, growth, funding, team, founders.

2. If you think of anyone who might enjoy this email, you can share this with a friend or co-worker.

Web –

Climb Lean School of Starting Up

Climb Lean Blog

Climb Lean Facebook page

The 3 Things This Week : 8th February, 2018

Hey,

Happy Thursday!

I am happy to introduce you Climb Lean’s weekly newsletter – “The 3 Things This Week” to you.

Here are this week’s 3 things!

This week’s theme is lean startup methods and practices.

Thing # 1:  Don’t be afraid to pivot. Everybody does   by Sid Talwar

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Everybody pivots. If you ask anyone who’s run a business in the past, they’ll tell you they have pivoted a lot. They pivot based on everything from customer feedback to external advice, to market conditions. And it’s a good thing…it’s not shameful (another comment I heard recently).

In fact, as an entrepreneur, you should be ashamed if you don’t consider the

possibility of pivoting based on the circumstances in front of you to give your company the best opportunity to succeed. And that means making tough decisions, basing those decisions on relevant data, making them quickly, and then acting on them immediately.

Thing # 2:  I Started My Business on a Spreadsheet  by John Doherty

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Through a story of Credo, this article gives lessons for bootstrapped companies – that are relevant for most of the new startup businesses.

While explaining how Credo came into existence with a simple spreadsheet; John Doherty says, you need to nail the market pretty fast. Bootstrapping necessitates identifying a real need in the market.

Read on further and know more lessons from Credo.

Thing # 3:  The Leap and Lean Startup Approach  by Jennifer Xue

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When you take a “leap of faith” path, you merely need to know that you have what it takes to walk the first few steps without seeing the whole staircase. This means if you don’t have enough capital and other resources to work on the ideas, keep a positive attitude and remain enthusiastic. Airbnb and Snapchat

started out with a leap of faith and zero capital. Trusting one’s leap of faith and work through challenges with lean startup approach should be in every entrepreneur’s agenda. After all, every risk is not to be feared; every risk has a solution. Have faith; stay lean. Leap.

 

I would love to hear your feedback on 3 Things This Week.

Hope you enjoy, and thanks again for the privilege of emailing you!

Wishing you lots of happy reading,

Shashank

 

P.S. –

1. The 3 Things This Week” is a free, short, curated list of useful articles, tools and other resources for building startup businesses. These 3 things would deal, in a random way, with different aspects of startup building – validation, traction, growth, funding, team, founders.

2. If you think of anyone who might enjoy this email, you can share this with a friend or co-worker.

Web –

Climb Lean School of Starting Up

Climb Lean Blog

Climb Lean Facebook page

The 3 Things This Week, 1st February, 2018

Hey,

How are you doing?

I am happy to bring this week’s edition of “The 3 Things This Week” to you.

As you know, “The 3 Things This Week” is a free, short, curated list of useful articles, tools and other resources for building startup businesses. These 3 things would deal, in a random way, with different aspects of startup building – validation, traction, growth, funding, team, founders.

Here are this week’s 3 things!

This week’s theme is business models from past, present, and future. And some lessons about them.

Thing # 1Driverless Hotel Rooms: The End of Uber, Airbnb and Human Landlords  by Nathan Waters

 

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The inevitable reality of on-demand self-driving cars poses a huge looming existential risk to the entire auto industry. What is common to a nearly 1.3 billion vehicles on the planet is the fact that they are parked idle for 95% of the time.

And, here is a threat to the auto industry from a possibility of driverless on-demand cab services. When your $10 Uber ride suddenly becomes a sub-$1 ride anywhere in the city, the appeal of owning a car will diminish for most of the population, thus creating a massive oversupply of unwanted human-driven vehicles.

Not only that, but when auto manufacturers rapidly meet the 100 million vehicle demand for driverless on-demand transport, they will inevitably pivot operations to manufacture driverless modular rooms that cater to specific human experiences.

Read this article to know how driverless hotel rooms sound like changing times for Uber or Airbnb kind of business models.

Thing # 2How GE avoided Kodak’s fate  by  Ron Miller

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We are probably well aware of Kodak’s downfall when they did not pay attention to the market changes in respect of digital photography and lost an opportunity to change its business model in time.

But, you may not be too familiar with the story as to how GE just did the opposite and managed to not only stay afloat, but also grow.

Back in 1888 in Rochester, New York, George Eastman founded Kodak. Four years later, 200 miles down the road in Schenectady, New York, Thomas Edison and some pals founded General Electric. The two 19th-century industrial giants chugged along for more than 100 years, but GE is still rolling along with a market cap of over $250 billion and Kodak is a shadow of its former self with a market cap of $466 million, much of its camera and film business flushed down the disruption pipes of late-20th-century digitization.  Read this article to get answers to the question – how did GE manage to avoid the same fate?

Thing # 3Learning to Fool Our Algorithmic Spies   by John Herrman

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We all are very much aware that we are being watched over the internet. Every move we make in the virtual world doesn’t get noticed.

It is interesting to read how Facebook and Twitter and Instagram are inextricably tied to the experience of being monitored by others, which, if it doesn’t always produce “prosocial”

behavior in the broad psychological sense, but seems to have encouraged behaviors useful to the platforms themselves — activity and growth. These businesses serve many different purposes, but the one thing they have in common is that they have figured out new ways to monetize the powerful twin sensations of seeing and being seen by others.  Read this article to understand how these businesses leverage from “being watched” phenomenon.

 

I  would love to hear your feedback on 3 Things This Week.

Hope you enjoy, and thanks again for the privilege of emailing you!

Wishing you lots of happy reading,

 

Shashank

 

P.S.

  1. If you want to receive a regular weekly update, sign up here,  or subscribe to this blog.
  2. If you think of anyone who might enjoy this email, you can share this with a friend or co-worker.

 

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