Startup traction channel: tradeshows

tradeshows

This blog article is based on the 3 Things This Week’s edition dated 24th May 2018. The theme of this edition is “Tradeshows”, one of the difficult channels for startups!

 

Trade Shows Trade shows are a chance for companies to show off their products in person. These events are often exclusive to industry insiders and are designed to foster interactions between vendors and their prospects.

Trade shows give you more direct interaction with customers, partners, and press in a short period of time than most other traction channels. This channel has the potential to move the needle in a matter of days.

The ideal way to decide whether you should exhibit at a trade show is to visit as a guest and do a walk through the year before. The next best option is to get the opinions of people who have attended the event in previous years.

Your traction goals should drive your decisions on which events to attend. For example, are you trying to get press, lure investors, land major customers, work out significant partnerships, or something else? Schedule meetings with people you want to meet at trade shows (e.g. potential customers, partners, press) well before you attend the event. Dinners are a great way to combine meetings. Have an inbound and outbound strategy for your booth. Structure the inside of your booth (including what you say) around your particular goals. Include a strong call to action on every item (e.g. business card) you give out.

Here are the three things this week about tradeshows:

Thing #1: The Ultimate Guide to Exhibiting at a Trade Show

Successfully exhibiting at a trade show is no walk in the park. It takes a lot of effort to pull it off, so you have to go in prepared. If you want to experience trade show success, you need to start planning for each show far in advance. Follow this guide to ace your first trade show and each one afterward too.  You get the right perspective on everything including your reasons for exhibiting; finding the right trade shows;  how to work on your trade show budget;  getting professionals design your exhibit;  working on logistic about representatives, responsibilities, transport and accommodation, promotional materials and also working on collecting leads.

Thing # 2: How To Make A Killer Trade Show Booth On A Budget

How can you create a super successful trade show booth and get the most bang for your buck? If you search Google for trade show displays, you’ll easily find displays and setups that cost well over $1000, but that’s a heck of a lot of money for equipment you might only use every now and then. In this article,  you get the strategies and resources that can be used to make and design a booth that’ll make you stand out, with the nice bonus of being economical.  Successful trade show booths don’t have to be expensive. Going by the tips in this article, the booth setup cost less than $250.

Thing # 3: Case Study: How Telaeris Uses Drip To Automate Trade Show Follow-Up and Win More Business From Industry Events

You know the feeling of coming back from a conference. You’ve got a pocket full of business cards.  You’re jazzed with ideas.  You want to send “nice to meet you” emails to everyone you’ve met and nurture those relationships… until Monday morning rolls around.  Then it’s back to your to-do list. Many of those business cards get lost in the shuffle, or worse, you start conversations with some promising leads who fall out of touch.  According to Online Marketing Institute, it takes 6 to 8 touches to generate a viable sales lead. It’s safe to say, many companies and consultants give up way too soon.  The question is… How can you build a machine that stays in touch with contacts, 100% of the time (even if it falls off your to-do list)? David from Telaeris has built an automated system to solve this pain. And he’s done it while still being authentic and adding value to leads. In this article, David how he maximizes his ROI om tradeshows engagements.

 

I would be happy to know how you have used this traction channel for your business and if you have some lessons to share with fellow entrepreneurs.

 

 

 

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